22. 08. 2016
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The Matter of History: Himalayan Mountaineering, its Archives & some Inexcusable Gaps

  Amrita Dhar _______________   The Flour and the Porters One summer morning a few years ago I was walking hurriedly across a stretch of Hyde Park in London. I was returning to...

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19. 12. 2015
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The Wind Instruments

HUG Editorial ______________________ # Humanities Studies in India at this Point of Time. There are two sides to it. One, institutional studies of the humanities. By that we mean the study of the...

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16. 09. 2014
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Blood Is Remarkably Red Against Green

  Viktor Shklovsky [ A short excerpt from A Sentimental Journey: Memoirs, 1917-1922. Viktor Shklovsky, a leading figure in the Russian formalist movement of the 1920s,  borrows the title from Laurence Sterne. In the book...

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05. 04. 2014
Historian Jacques Le Goff in His Home Office

The Vision of Drythelm

  Jacques Le Goff [Jacques Le Goff, the medieval historian and editor-in-chief of the journal Annales died last Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Here is a section from his ground-breaking work The Birth of...

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21. 09. 2013
A Bloody Battle and Sundry Changes

A Bloody Battle and Sundry Changes

[Here is a review of  Marc Morris’ recent The Norman Conquest The Battle of Hastings and the Fall of Anglo-Saxon England (Pegusus, 2013)--originally published in the Gulfport Public Library site and Steven Till's medieval...

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06. 06. 2013
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Democracy as Oil

    Mazen Labban [Review of Timothy Mitchell’s Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil.” The review first appeared in Antipodefoundation.org]           As Something Animal “If a...

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30. 05. 2013
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The Unaccommodated: The Himalaya and the Makers of Their Literature

Amrita Dhar   [Amrita Dhar is a graduate student in the English Language and Literature PhD Program at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has been reading about and visiting the Himalayan...

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04. 05. 2013
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Theatre, Number, Event: A Second Appraisal

Prathama Banerjee [ HUG reproduces a second appraisal and an early critique of Soumyabrata Choudhury's newly published book Theatre, Number, Event: Three Studies on the Relationship between Sovereignty, Power and Truth, IIAS, Delhi, 2013. The writer...

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28. 04. 2013
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Theatre, Number, Event : An Appraisal

Saitya Brata Das   [The writer was one of the discussants in a recently organized session at C.S.D.S. , New Delhi, on the occasion of the release of Soumyabrata Choudhury’s book—Theatre, Number, Event:...

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13. 04. 2013
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Bhaduriji

  Phanishwar Nath Renu on Satinath Bhaduri [HUG translates part of Phanishwar Nath Renu’s reminiscences on Satinath Bhaduri and his times. The original piece appears in Satinath Shawrone (Reminiscing Satinath), edited by Subal...

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22. 12. 2012
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The Political Economy of Reading

William St Clair Last year, some of us were privileged to hear the first John Coffin Memorial Lecture given by Robert Darnton entitled 'The Devil in the Holy Water.' In that talk, by offering a...

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12. 12. 2012
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Why Stephen Greenblatt is Wrong — and Why It Matters

Jim Hinch One year ago this month, Harvard Shakespeare scholar Stephen Greenblatt stepped to the podium at the Cipriani Club in New York City to accept the National Book Award for nonfiction. Greenblatt...

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03. 08. 2012
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The Foreboding of Autumn: Aamir Bashir’s Harud

Akhil Katyal Director: Aamir Bashir Cast: Reza Naji, Shanawaz Bhat, Shamim Basharat, Salma Ashai If you work with silence as your frame, every sound gets registered. If you work with scarcity as your chosen form,...

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13. 07. 2012
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Laziness & Work: An Interview with Pierre Saint-Amand

Sina Najafi and Pierre Saint-Amand Jean-Siméon Chardin, Auguste-Gabriel Godefroy Watching a Top Spin, 1738. The roots of our contemporary obsession with work and productivity are usually traced to the eighteenth century, when the new...

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